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Free MCLE Programs
October 23, 30 & November 7

Wednesday, October 23, Noon to 1:00
2019: The year the California Supreme Court
“workshopped” Anti-SLAPP
Presented by John Wierzbicki
Director, Witkin Legal Institute
1 Hour free MCLE Credit

Download Flyer Here
Download Materials Here

Wednesday, October 30, Noon to 1:00
Employment Law Update:
A Closer Look at COBRA
Presented by Cristina A. Collazo,
Senior Benefits Advisor
United States Department of Labor
1 Hour free MCLE Credit

Download Flyer Here

Thursday, November 7, Noon to 1:00
Advanced Research on Westlaw
Presented by Jonathan Dorsey
Client Representative, Government,
Thomson Reuters
1 Hour free MCLE Credit
This is a repeat of the
January 17, 2018 MCLE program
An email address is required to receive the MCLE certificate from Thomson

Download Flyer Here

 

New Resource: New Titles LibGuide

The San Francisco Law Library's collection of print materials continues to grow. Keep track of our collection with our newest LibGuide: New Titles. This guide highlights new additions in various subject areas including civil procedure, criminal law, and real estate. You can search by topic or year, and the lists link directly to our catalog so that you can immediately check for availability. We will update this guide regularly, so be sure to check back in for more new titles! Find the guide here.

Consumer Rights Legal Clinic
4th Thursday each month
Thursday, October 24, 9:30am & 1pm

Presented by Bay Area Legal Aid

***Download English & Spanish Flyer Here***

This free clinic is held at the SF Law Library on the fourth Thursday of each month. RSVP is required—please call 415-982-1300 to reserve your spot. At the clinic, you can speak with an attorney for free about bankruptcy, student loan debt, collection actions, debt collectors, resolving errors in your credit report, judgments regarding unpaid debt, foreclosure, and wage garnishment.

October Book Drive—Purchase a Book for the Library!

Books

Each month we will seek donors to purchase new titles for the Library. Here is the book Wish List for October:

 

Running with the Bulls

 

Running with the Bulls: How to Win Top Dollar Settlements
Written by Nicholas Rowley & Courtney Rowley
$165, Paperback, 2019
ISBN: 9781941007822

 

30b6 Deposing Corporations

 

30(b)(6): Deposing Corporations, Organizations & the Government
Written by Mark R. Kosieradzki
$155, Paperback, 2016
ISBN: 978-1941007549

 

Thank you to James Michel for generously donating Truth in Lending, 10th ed.

Thank you to an Anonymous donor for generously donating Representing People with Mental Disabilities: A Practical Guide for Criminal Defense Lawyers, part of our April Book Drive.

Please take a look at our Book Drive page to see Wish List items from prior months. We are still wishing for these books!

To donate, please contact sflawlibrary@sfgov.org or call (415) 554-1791. We appreciate your contribution!

 

 

Impeachment  Resources

Impeachment


Impeachment:
A Citizen's Guide
 By Cass Sunstein

 

 

To End a Presidency by Tribe
 

To End a Presidency 
By Laurence A. Tribe
& Joshua Matz 

 

 

Limits of Presidential Power



The Limits of
Presidential Power

By Lisa Manheim & Kathryn Watts

 

 


Nixon Impeachment



The Nixon Impeachment Collection

 

 

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Visit Our Blog:

Visit our "sflawlibraryblog." Our blog highlights library news, resources, and events.

Law Library Book of the Month
The President's House
Written by William Seale

Reviewed by Tony Pelczynski, Reference Assistant

The President’s House, by independent historian William Seale, is an engaging—if initially imposing—two-volume history of the White House. Running chronologically through America’s Presidential line, from George Washington (who commissioned the construction of the White House, but never actually lived in it) to George H.W. Bush, the book covers the gamut of White House history in entertaining detail. Housed in a sturdy and handsome slipcase, and running to just over 1200 pages, Seale has written an enlightening history of what just might be the most recognizable residence in the world.

Seale, editor of the journal White House History, is eminently qualified to take on the topic: in addition to researching and writing about historic buildings, he restores them. Seale is clearly interested in the White House from (quite literally) the ground up. And while the subject matter and length of the book may seem off-putting to those outside the presumably limited circle of hardcore White House history buffs, Seale’s lively prose and storytelling keep the reader absorbed. While the focus is on the structure itself, the book’s scope necessarily expands beyond (or, more to the point, into) the White House’s walls, taking into account the lives of the men and women who have lived and worked under the White House’s roof: the Presidents and their families, of course, but also the gardeners, cooks, maintenance workers, and others who have historically kept the place running, day-to-day.

As both residence and locus of Presidential power, the White House has always stood alone, symbolically: while the U.S. Capitol and the Supreme Court building may arguably be equally recognizable structures, they both represent collective democratic institutions. The White House is, uniquely, the home of a single (albeit enormously important) individual and his family. Seale’s expansive history continually reminds the reader that the White House is, first and foremost, just that: an actual American home, filled with the messiness and unpredictability of human life that term implies. Over the years, the building has hosted births, deaths, weddings, funerals, and any number of other milestones of human happiness and suffering, to say nothing of the physical upheavals that the structure itself, has endured over the years.

At the same time, the White House has always functioned as something of a national museum and political stage. Even those who have never set foot inside the building can conjure a mental image of the Oval Office, or (as is more likely) one of its many cinematic or television iterations. Perhaps because of the White House’s fixity in the American imagination, various presidents and their spouses have, to varying degrees, attempted to stamp the abode with their own personalities and identities, frequently to less than unanimous critical acclaim (recall here Melania Trump’s much-derided minimalist Christmas displays). Seale does a fine job of surveying the various changes the White House and its décor have undergone over the years, none more extensive than President Truman’s “down to the studs” renovations.

Seale ends The President’s House at the George H.W. Bush administration, although he does include a too-brief epilogue touching on the Bill Clinton and George W. Bush years. At 80 years old, Seale may be done writing on the topic, but his book leaves the reader hoping for at least one more update covering the last two Presidential administrations. While its current occupant has reportedly proclaimed the White House to be “a real dump,” given the care and attention to detail that Seale has so clearly poured into his book, one gets the impression that the author feels very, very differently on the subject. Update or no, The President’s House will likely remain the definitive history of this most symbolic of American residences for years to come.