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Library News: 

The Law Library is pleased to announce that Assistant Director Diane Rodriguez was elected Vice President/President-Elect of the national American Association of Law Libraries for 2020–2022. This is a great honor and a measure of Ms. Rodriguez's outstanding leadership and accomplishments as a champion of Access to Justice. 

Free MCLE Programs
Jan 29 and Feb 13

Wednesday, January 29, 2020, Noon to 1:00pm
Post Conviction for Lawyers and Their Clients
Presented By Jo-Anna Nieves Esq.
Managing Attorney and C.E.O.
The Nieves Law Firm, APC
1 Hour free Participatory MCLE Credit

Download Flyer Here 

 Thursday, February 13, Noon to 1:00pm 
Introduction to Westlaw
Presented by Jonathan Dorsey, Esq.
Client Representative, Government,
Thomson Reuters
1 Hour free Participatory MCLE Credit*
*This is a repeat of the 7/12/17 and 12/13/17 programs. An Email address is required to receive the MCLE certificate from Thomson.

Download Flyer Here
Download this free Westlaw
patron access user guide. 

New Resource: New Titles LibGuide

The San Francisco Law Library's collection of print materials continues to grow. Keep track of our collection with our newest LibGuide: New Titles. This guide highlights new additions in various subject areas including civil procedure, criminal law, and real estate. You can search by topic or year, and the lists link directly to our catalog so that you can immediately check for availability. We will update this guide regularly, so be sure to check back in for more new titles! Find the guide here.

Consumer Rights Legal Clinic
Thursday, January 23, 9:30am & 1pm

Presented by Bay Area Legal Aid

***Download English & Spanish Flyer Here***

This free clinic is held at the SF Law Library on the fourth Thursday of each month. There is no clinic in December; it resumes in January 2020. RSVP is required—please call 415-982-1300 to reserve your spot. At the clinic, you can speak with an attorney for free about bankruptcy, student loan debt, collection actions, debt collectors, resolving errors in your credit report, judgments regarding unpaid debt, foreclosure, and wage garnishment.

 

 

 

Impeachment  Resources

Impeachment


Impeachment:
A Citizen's Guide
 By Cass Sunstein

 

 

To End a Presidency by Tribe
 

To End a Presidency 
By Laurence A. Tribe
& Joshua Matz 

 

 

Limits of Presidential Power



The Limits of
Presidential Power

By Lisa Manheim & Kathryn Watts

 

 


Nixon Impeachment



The Nixon Impeachment Collection

 

 

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Visit Our Blog:

Visit our "sflawlibraryblog." Our blog highlights library news, resources, and events.

Law Library Book of the Month
Misfits, Merchants & Mayhem: Tales from San Francisco’s Historic Waterfront, 1849–1934 
Written by Lee Bruno

Misfits, Merchants & Mayhem: Tales from San Francisco’s Historic Waterfront, 1849–1934 is an extraordinary book that explores San Francisco’s waterfront history by focusing on a variety of incredible individuals who marked the City’s formative years. Author Lee Bruno divides the period 1849–1934 into six chapters: the Gold Rush Era (1848–1855), the Comstock Load (1859–1870), the Gilded Age (1870–1900), the Great Earthquake & Fire (1906), the Jewel City (1907–1920), and the Jazz Age (1920–1934). Bruno focuses on several “movers and shakers” for each era, with vivid accompanying photographs and graphics for each person and time period. 

Misfits, Merchants & Mayhem is more than a historic journey of San Francisco, as many of the people discussed in this book exemplify the effect that the era’s laws had on their lives and opportunities. One example is William Leidesdorff Jr., who was born on St. Croix to a Danish plantation manager and a mixed-race mother. He left the West Indies and made a small fortune as a shipmaster in New Orleans, and planned to marry a local plantation owner’s daughter. However, when her family discovered he was part black, they canceled the approaching wedding and the bride died shortly after, allegedly of a broken heart. Leidesdorff left New Orleans for Yerba Buena when New Orleans adopted the Negro Seaman Act of 1822, which barred black people from holding maritime jobs. In Yerba Buena, Leidesdorff became a prominent citizen and business leader primed for the U.S. takeover of California. He died of meningitis just when gold was discovered near his property on the American River, but the battle over his estate raged for over 50 years with foreign relatives being barred from inheriting, conflicting international laws and new probate laws confounding the process, and even the U.S. government claiming ownership. San Francisco still has an alley named for him where his commercial shipping warehouse was located (the City’s first), and a plaque near the Ferry Building.

Another notable example is Lew Hing, who at age 12 came to San Francisco from China to work with his brother in a metal working shop in 1871. By 1878, he had saved enough money to open a cannery business. By trial and error, he learned the cannery business (his was located at the corner of Sacramento and Stockton streets) and he overcame the rampant discrimination against the Chinese and false accusations of opium smuggling to become one of the biggest fruit canners on the West Coast. Hing was ineligible for citizenship because of the Chinese Exclusion Act, but he was very much a member of the community and was instrumental in assisting the city after the 1906 earthquake.

By delving into the lives of each period’s notable figures, Misfits, Merchants & Mayhem reveals how these fascinating individuals transformed the city and helped shape it into what it is today. To read this book is to travel back in time, with the research, prose, and photographs providing a completely immersive experience.