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Free MCLE Programs May 15 & 21

Wednesday, May 15, Noon to 1:00pm
Litigation Research with Westlaw
1 Hour Free Participatory MCLE, Presented by Jonathan Dorsey, Esq.,
Client Representative, Government, Thomson Reuters
An email address is required to receive the MCLE Certificate from Thomson

***Download Flyer Here***

Tuesday, May 21, Noon  to 1:30pm
Tips for Taking an Effective Deposition 
Presented by Richard Koskoff, Booth and Koskoff

ceb logoCo-sponsored with CEB
1.5 Hours 
free
 general participatory MCLE credit to those attending at the SF Law Library
***Download Flyer Here***

Watch the July 2018 Library Free Speech Special Event 

**Watch the Video Here**
Free Speech and the First Amendment:
Why do we give Nazis free speech
—and should we?

Presented by:
Erwin Chemerinsky, Dean and Jesse H. Choper Distinguished Professor of Law, Berkeley Law
Bernadette Meyler, Carla and Sheila Spaeth Professor of Law, Stanford Law
Justice Therese Stewart, California Court of Appeal, First Appellate District
Justice Jon Streeter, California Court of Appeal, First Appellate District
Moderator: Ben Feuer, Chairman, California Appellate Law Group LLP
Co-sponsored with The Bar Association of San Francisco

April Book Drive—Purchase a Book for the Library!

Books

Each month we will seek donors to purchase new titles for the Library. Here is the book Wish List for April:

The Trial Lawyer

The Trial Lawyer: What It Takes to Win, 2nd ed.
Written by David Berg
$99.95, Paperback, 2018
ISBN: 978-1-64105-110-1

The ABA is offering 25% off with promo code REVIEW19

 

Representing People with Mental Disabilities

Representing People with Mental Disabilities: A Practical Guide for Criminal Defense Lawyers
Edited by Elizabeth Kelley
$49.95, Paperback, 2018
ISBN: 978-1-64105-176-7

The ABA is offering 25% off with promo code REVIEW19

 

Internet of Things

Internet of Things (IoT): Legal Issues, Policy, & Practical Strategies
Edited by Cynthia H. Cwik, Christopher A. Suarez, and Lucy L. Thomson
$89.95, Paperback, 2019
ISBN: 978-1-64105-364-8

 

Thank you to James Michel for generously donating John Lennon vs. The USA: The Inside Story of the Most Bitterly Contested and Influential Deportation Case in United States History, part of our August 2018 Book Drive.

Thank you to Althea Kippes for generously donating both books from our February Book Drive—California Animal Laws Handbook, 2019 and The Art of Fact Investigation.

Thank you to Brenna Moorhead for generously donating Dred Scott v. Sandford:
Opinions and Contemporary Commentary
, from our May 2018 Book Drive. 

Please take a look at our Book Drive page to see Wish List items from prior months. We are still wishing for these books!

To donate, please contact sflawlibrary@sfgov.org or call (415) 554-1791. We appreciate your contribution!

 

 

Resources for California
Fire Victims

A compilation of resources to help those affected by the California wildfires.

 

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E-Update Newsletter

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Visit Our New Blog:

Visit our new "sflawlibraryblog." Our blog will highlight library news, resources, and events.

Law Library Book of the Month:
The Library Book
By Susan Orlean
Reviewed by Courtney Nguyen, Reference Librarian

Fire. Stolen books. Lawsuits. Threats of eviction. Lack of funding.

Susan Orlean writes about nearly everything that a library fears in The Library Book, her fascinating and deeply researched account of the 1986 fire that destroyed the Central Public Library of Los Angeles. Like the best modern public libraries, Orlean's extraordinary book is difficult to define: The Library Book is a true crime story of an unsolved arson case from the 1980s; a chronicle of the Los Angeles Public Library and her colorful directors, librarians, and patrons; a study of the evolving role of the library in American society; and a memoir of a lifelong reader and library patron. The sprawling cast of characters includes an aspiring actor with a penchant for lying (and perhaps fire); an eighteen-year-old female library director whose father had to walk her home from work because of her age; and a librarian who sneakily read “dangerous” books kept locked in a metal cage in the basement during her lunch break. All of these elements and more come together to form a sweeping panorama of the public library’s unique place in the community and people’s lives.

Just as a library contains different subjects and genres to appeal to a wide audience, so too does Orlean offer something for everyone by looking at the fire and the institution of libraries from various and oftentimes surprising angles. The chapter devoted to the actual April 29, 1986 blaze rivals the intensity of any action film, while her sobering examination of the practice of book burning frames the fire in a new devastating light. Orlean's search for the possible arsonist is as riveting as any true crime serial, and her journalism background moves to the forefront as she follows suspects, detectives, firemen, city attorneys, and those charged with dealing with the aftermath of the destruction. Library enthusiasts can delight in the (often cheeky) card catalog headings that open each chapter before reading about the inner workings of a modern public library and what librarians actually do all day. Orlean's book also serves as a history of the library and Los Angeles from the 1800s to the present-day, for a history of a public library will inevitably also be a history of a city and a community.

Orlean writes that “[A] library is as much a portal as it is a place—it is a transit point, a passage.” The same could be said of her book, which serves as both a record of fires and eccentric librarians as well as a portal to thinking about the importance and future of libraries. The book makes a strong case for the idea that libraries are embedded in a city physically and mentally—physically in the form of the actual buildings as well as through the constant transportation of library materials to the different branches, running like veins through the city; and mentally in the knowledge they guard and the memories they hold for both lifelong and casual patrons. Perhaps we are biased, but The Library Book is essential reading for everyone in any community. Find this book in its natural habitat at a public library today, including ours.