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Library News: 

Free Special Event July 19 at Noon

Thursday, July 19, 2018, Noon to 1:00pm
Free Speech and the First Amendment:
Why do we give Nazis free speech—and should we?

Presented by:
Erwin Chemerinsky, Dean and Jesse H. Choper Distinguished Professor of Law, Berkeley Law
Bernadette Meyler, Carla and Sheila Spaeth Professor of Law, Stanford Law
Justice Therese Stewart, California Court of Appeal, First Appellate District
Justice Jon Streeter, California Court of Appeal, First Appellate District
Moderator: Ben Feuer, Chairman, California Appellate Law Group LLP
Co-sponsored with The Bar Association of San Francisco
Programs free and open to everyone
Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis
1 Hour free Participatory MCLE Credit

Recent MCLE Program Materials

**Download June 6 Program Materials Here**

June Book Drive—Purchase a Book for the Library!

Books

Each month we will seek donors to purchase a new title for the Library. Here is the book Wish List for June:

 

AI in Application

AI in Application: An In-Depth Examination from the Legal Profession
Written by Kate Boyd et al.
$195, Paperback, 2018
ISBN: 978-1-78358-320-1

 

 

Small Claims Procedures Manual

 

Small Claims Procedures Manual
Written by California Court Association
$55.95, Paperback, 2018

 

 

Thank you to Susan Petro for her generous donation of Black's Law Dictionary, 10th edition, part of our August 2017 Book Drive.

Please take a look at our Book Drive page to see Wish List items from prior months. We are still wishing for these books!

To donate, please contact sflawlibrary@sfgov.org or call (415) 554-1791. We appreciate your contribution!

 

 

 

 

 

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Visit our new "sflawlibraryblog." Our blog will highlight library news, resources, and events.

Law Library Book of the Month:

Benched: Abortion, Terrorists, Drones, Crooks, Supreme Court, Kennedy, Nixon, Demi Moore & Other Tales from the Life of a Federal Judge
By Jon O. Newman
Reviewed by Aaron Parsons, Reference Librarian

In Benched, Justice Jon O. Newman writes candidly about his remarkable career as an attorney, federal trial court judge, and Justice on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

With a glowing forward by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonya Sotomayor, Justice Newman gives an inside account of how judges think and what they do.

Early in his legal career, Newman clerked for U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice Earl Warren. He was a high-level staffer in President Kennedy’s administration for what is now the Department of Health and Human Services, where his many assignments included studying health effects related to fallout from Russian nuclear tests. He describes challenges faced as a Senate staffer, and the difficulty of working with different sides in Congress to agree on even non-substantive changes in legislation.

Appointed as the U.S. Attorney for the District of Connecticut, he humbly describes learning on the job while trying civil and criminal cases on issues such as heroin smuggling, enforcing draft evasion statutes during the Vietnam War, civil rights prosecutions, and being whacked with an umbrella by a woman after a takings case.

Justice Newman provides insight into the behind-the-scenes workings of the legal and political system, describing what it’s like to go through the Senate nomination process three times, how judges distribute caseloads, and their negotiation and decision-making processes—such as the preference of some judges to debate with their colleagues through memoranda and not through verbal exchanges. He relates an argument with the late Justice Scalia over statutory interpretation.

His judicial decisions included military drone strikes, a free speech case over school books (among them was Slaughterhouse Five, which prompted a complimentary letter from author Kurt Vonnegut), a law requiring royalties from the book Wiseguy and its movie adaptation, Goodfellas, be distributed to victims, and a case that required interpretation of the Articles of Confederation.

Justice Newman discusses his reactions to the handful of times that the U.S. Supreme Court reversed his Second Circuit opinions, and another when that Court reversed and essentially sided with his dissent. He offers ideas on how to improve the American justice system, including burdens of proof, supervised depositions, and increased use of independent counsel.

Read Justice Newman’s autobiography, and biographies of more judges and attorneys, at the Law Library.